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Hood River Valley Integrated Codling Moth Management

Grant Recipient:

Jean Godfrey, Executive Director (program)
(541) 387-4769
cgfg2@gorge.net
Columbia Gorge Fruit Growers

Project Period:

March 1, 2009 March 10, 2010

Principal Investigator:

Jean Godfrey

Downloads:

R10 2009-02 IPR1.pdf (46.46 KB)
R10 2009-02 Revised Final Report.pdf (51.7 KB)
CGFG Godfrey Proposal.doc (92 KB)

Description
The outcomes of this project will be the elimination or substantial reduction in the amount of azinphosmethyl and phosmet used in the estimated 1400 acres of pear and apple orchards included in the implementation area in the Hood River Valley. This will be accomplished through the adoption of integrated control programs for codling moth with a foundation of pheromone mating disruption used on an areawide basis. An intensive monitoring program will be conducted to support threshold-based decision making and supplemental treatments will be selected from the least disruptive option. Project customers will gain first- hand experience with this holistic approach to codling moth management backed up with a high level of technical support. This project will provide a model for codling moth management applicable to the entire pear and apple industries in the Mid-Columbia region, has broad stakeholder support, and has significant environmental, economic, and social impacts.

Project goals and objectives
1. Sixty percent of the growers in the implementation area currently conduct traditional codling moth management programs using a cover-spray approach rather than IPM programs. Of those, 90 percent will adopt an integrated control program that includes:
pheromone mating disruption in all pear and apple acreage applied at full label rate
monitoring with pheromone traps at one trap per three to five acres
threshold-based decision making for supplemental treatments
optimal use of new codling moth insecticides
sanitation for non-commercial hosts of codling moth

2. Sixty percent of the growers in the implementation area currently use AZM, phosmet, or both for codling moth control. Of those, 80 percent will eliminate or reduce the use of these compounds in their pear and apple pest management programs.

Outcomes
1. During the 2009 season, all of the growers applied pheromone mating disruption in all pear and apple acreage applied at full label rate and all participated in the monitoring program for codling moth using the rate of one trap per three to five acres. The growers were surveyed at the end of the growing season on their use of monitoring information in their pest management decisions. Twenty of the 24 participating growers responded to the survey. Threshold based decision making for codling moth management was widely adopted but not absolute. All growers with codling moth trap catches exceeding the threshold sprayed at least some orchard blocks based on that information. Of those with codling moth trap catches below the threshold, most did not spray because the threshold was not exceeded, however, some did spray at least some orchard blocks even though the threshold was not exceeded. All growers chose specific pesticide products with the intention of conserving beneficial arthropods. The sanitation program for non-commercial hosts of codling moth was conducted in the project areas as part of the CGFG Backyard Tree Program.

2. The growers were surveyed at the end of the growing season on their pesticide use. Twenty of the 24 participating growers responded to the survey. Our original estimates of prior AZM and phosmet use in the project area exceeded those reported by the participating growers. None the less, use of both of these OP insecticides was reduced during the 2009 season, and previous reductions achieved in the Dee Flat project area were maintained.
Participating growers in Dee Flat did not use any AZM or phosmet in 2008 or 2009.
Thirty-eight percent of participating growers in Odell did use some AZM or phosmet in 2008; in 2009, that was reduced to 17 percent.

Project Links
www.hrgsa.org/

American Farmland Trust